HOW BRAIN WORKS

As research has shown, children who develop more interneuronal connections during the early phase of development find schooling easy and become more confident. They enjoy themselves more during school and play.

Learning is like the creation of a new file in the hippocampus area of brain (similar to the creation of a temporary file on the desktop of a computer). This file needs to be saved in the cerebral cortex of brain, to be stored as a permanent file (equivalent to c: drive of a computer). This newly created file in the hippocampus needs to be re-visited and practised in order to be saved in the cerebral cortex.

Learning is not linear and it is enhanced with the result of associations which our brain develops during the different phases of life. The speed of learning or creation of new files (like the speed of the processor in a computer) is dependent on the activity of the brain, organizational skills, learning styles, study techniques, association methods, interests, age and habits. Those children who master the skill of association and organisation in the early stages of life find learning easy.

Concentration and memory work together, but require effort and planning to synchronize. To concentrate is to direct your mental powers, or efforts, towards a particular activity, subject, or problem. Memory is the ability to remember information, experiences, and people. Improving memory and concentration can be challenging. There are some specific skills that can be learned to enhance both concentration and memory. Practicing these skills is likely to improve one’s success as a student.

108 Components that affect Learning & Integration of Memory are

  • Ownership in learning
  • Ability to associate things/situations
  • Chunking
  • Elaborative Rehearsal
  • Maintenance Rehearsal
  • Passion
  • Perseverance
  • Active retrieval
  • Spacing
  • Interleaving practice
  • Take away after study period
  • Napping between studies
  • Cooperative Learning
  • Debate
  • Discussion
  • Dramatic play
  • Experiential Learning
  • Instructional Effectiveness
  • Lecture Method
  • Peer teaching
  • Role Playing
  • Teaching method
  • Ability to teach after learning
  • Grit
  • Explicit remembering
  • Implicit remembering
  • Peg word mnemonics
  • Meaningful application of learning
  • Developmental milestones
  • Parents Education
  • Low-stakes quizzing
  • Self-testing
  • Spacing out practice
  • Positivity in surrounding
  • Reflection on Learning
  • Effortful retrieval

  • Hearing
  • Vision
  • Speech
  • Space visualisation
  • Auditory Processing
  • Visual processing
  • Vestibular Processing
  • Tactile Processing
  • Oral sensory Processing
  • Multi-sensory Processing
  • Sensory Seeking
  • Sensory Sensitivity
  • Registration
  • Attention
  • Postural praxis
  • Praxis on verbal command
  • Constructional praxis
  • Sequential praxis
  • Midline crossing
  • Motor control
  • Design copy
  • Motor accuracy
  • Bilateral motor coordination
  • Fine motor skills
  • Level of arousal
  • Laterality concept
  • Orientation
  • Initiation of activity
  • Termination of activity
  • Attention span
  • Concept formation
  • Spatial perception
  • Social conduct
  • Interpersonal skills
  • Self-expression
  • Coping skills

  • Self-control
  • Sharing/Turn taking
  • Hygienicity of environment
  • Impulsiveness check
  • Sleep
  • Habits
  • Diet
  • Play
  • Interest
  • Learning posture
  • Note taking
  • Rehearsal
  • Scheduling/Organisational skills
  • Learning style
  • Study duration
  • Time management
  • Ability to relax at will
  • Mood
  • Types of Brain wave pattern
  • Vision for the future
  • Dreams
  • Diary keeping
  • Self esteem
  • Self confidence
  • Peer support
  • Parental support
  • Bed time reading
  • Faith in source of knowledge
  • Listening skills
  • Addiction to electronic Gadgets
  • Television timings
  • Food timings
  • Praising the hard work
  • Appropriate feedback
  • Application of knowledge
  • Health & Happiness